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View Full Version : Question for Limmer Boot Guys


Tony Tiger
02-21-2009, 12:35 PM
I recently got a pair of the Limmer mid-weight boots. They really are very nice. But they are quite stiff. Limmer's website says to "soften" the leather when new using animal-based grease products -- or something like that.

I have the Limmer conditioner/waterproofer that came with the boots, but I'm not sure if this is the thing to use to soften the boots when brand new. I sent an email to Limmer asking for an opinion, but figured some of you have experience with this.

Let me know what you did, if anything, with your new boots. Right now, these are like ski boots in terms of stiffness -- obviously heavy-duty construction.

Thanks!

LIhikers
02-21-2009, 03:08 PM
.....I recently got a pair of the Limmer mid-weight boots. They really are very nice. But they are quite stiff. Limmer's website says to "soften" the leather when new using animal-based grease products -- or something like that.


The first thing that I thought of, after reading your post, was bacon fat :eek:
If you used that to soften your boots you could probably eat them in an emergency :D

wildtroutchaser
02-21-2009, 08:21 PM
The Limmer Boot Grease that came with your boots contains a combination of animal paste and waterproofing additives, so you already have what you need. That's the easy part. I own a pair of Limmer Light-Weights which I have had for a while, and a pair of Limmer Standards that I have had for about six weeks. My Standards started out as you stated, "like ski boots in terms of stiffness". My initial reaction upon putting them on for the first time was that I might have made a mistake in purchasing them. But, I started wearing them around the house and running errands the first week, and each day I could tell a slight difference in how they felt. The second week I did the same thing and could actually feel the boots start molding to my feet. That weekend I went for a day hike in some pretty rugged terrain and had no problems. I've worn them on additional day hikes since then. I still don't consider them broken-in, but I feel like I'm on the right track. As near as I can tell, break-in requires patience and gradual activity. And if you start to feel any hot spots on your feet, take them off and wait until the following day to wear them, which is what I did. I waited to treat mine until they became scuffed. I hope this helps.

Camp Counselor
02-22-2009, 12:34 AM
When I first started hiking I used Mink Oil from Kiwi products to water proof my boots. I stopped using it after I a few years because I found that it over softened the leather. So used in moderation initially it may do just what you need and what Limmer suggests.

Survivor Dave
02-22-2009, 01:22 AM
The first thing that I thought of, after reading your post, was bacon fat :eek:
If you used that to soften your boots you could probably eat them in an emergency :D

"Pork fat rules!"-Emeril Lagasse:D:D

goedde2
02-22-2009, 10:47 AM
I recently got a pair of the Limmer mid-weight boots. They really are very nice. But they are quite stiff. Limmer's website says to "soften" the leather when new using animal-based grease products -- or something like that.

I have the Limmer conditioner/waterproofer that came with the boots, but I'm not sure if this is the thing to use to soften the boots when brand new. I sent an email to Limmer asking for an opinion, but figured some of you have experience with this.

Let me know what you did, if anything, with your new boots. Right now, these are like ski boots in terms of stiffness -- obviously heavy-duty construction.

Thanks!

I purchased a pair of Limmers for my intended thru-hike in '05. Never happened. I had even arranged for a leave of absense, a very expensive leave of absense, from my work place. Those boots were are the absolute WORST choice I could have made. They tore up my feet so bad and put nickle sized blisters to the bone on the tops of my toes, so severely, I barely made it the first 30 miles to Neels Gap. By the time I was healed up enough to go again, a full two months later, I missed my window of opportunty I sent them back to Limmer for them to sell on consignment, no luck. Paid to have them sent back and actually sold them myself. They're great boots, and a lot of people go to Limmer to have a custom pair made, but they take about 20 years to break in. One thing you have to keep in mind is when leather gets wet, it stays wet, your feet shrivel up, and you will have major problems. No need for the industrial strength built like a tank, and very heavy, leather boots. I talked to Andrew Skurka when he was in Atlanta, and he preferred trail running shoes, Hardrock Montrail, and used several pair of them for his C to C. I'm headed out again very soon, and plan to take nubuck and nylon that gets wet, but drys in hours, not days. For what it's worth, the salesperson at Neels Gap also had the same problem with a pair of Limmers he had purshased. My advice is to go light, sturdy, and supportive, and if you are able to use the low vs mid height, so much the better, Good luck.

JimHalpert
02-22-2009, 11:02 AM
any leather boot -- not just limmers -- needs to be broken in before trail use.

Iceman
02-22-2009, 03:18 PM
Tony -

I always used Sno-Seal for my leather boots. I put it on and GENTLY heated it with a hari dryer to speed the time it took to soak in.

Never had Limmer's but I am curious if any of the Limmer owners tried the gentle heat method?

There are always rumors that certain products cause stitch rot. I thought Mink Oil was one of them.

Tony Tiger
02-22-2009, 06:56 PM
...No need for the industrial strength built like a tank, and very heavy, leather boots...

During my 2007 hike I used a combination of Montrail Torre GTX boots, Montrail and Vasque trail runners, with good results. I especially liked the feel of the trail runners when I switched to them in Damascus. The lighter footwear definitely helped me go further, I believe. So I understand the notion of not over-doing it on boots/shoes when the weather warms.

I'm not contemplating a thru-hike with the new Limmers, but if I can get them broken-in successfully, I plan to try them on some week-long treks.

Appreciate the advice from all.